Backup and Recovery Systems

The backup and recovery system is the single most important computer service at your business. Neglecting this system can be Backup and Recovery Systemsextremely detrimental and costly. It is guaranteed that at some point your computer systems will experience hardware failure, user mistakes, or possible viral destruction of valuable information.  There is always the fear of theft, fire, or other disasters out of your control.  The bottom line in protection is to have daily reliable backups of your information and to formulate disaster recovery steps for when a problem occurs.  We can provide these solutions and implement strategies for prevention and disaster recovery.

What are Backups?

In information technology, a backup, or the process of backing up, refers to the copying and archiving of computer data so it may be used to restore the original after a data loss event. The verb form is to back up in two words, whereas the noun is backup.

Backups have two distinct purposes. The primary purpose is to recover data after its loss, be it by data deletion or corruption. Data loss can be a common experience of computer users. A 2008 survey found that 66% of respondents had lost files on their home PC. The secondary purpose of backups is to recover data from an earlier time, according to a user-defined data retention policy, typically configured within a backup application for how long copies of data are required. Though backups popularly represent a simple form of disaster recovery, and should be part of a disaster recovery plan, by themselves, backups should not alone be considered disaster recovery.One reason for this is that not all backup systems or backup applications are able to reconstitute a computer system or other complex configurations such as a computer cluster, active directory servers, or a database server, by restoring only data from a backup.

Since a backup system contains at least one copy of all data worth saving, the data storage requirements can be significant. Organizing this storage space and managing the backup process can be a complicated undertaking. A data repository model can be used to provide structure to the storage. Nowadays, there are many different types of data storage devices that are useful for making backups. There are also many different ways in which these devices can be arranged to provide geographic redundancy, data security, and portability.

Before data is sent to its storage location, it is selected, extracted, and manipulated. Many different techniques have been developed to optimize the backup procedure. These include optimizations for dealing with open files and live data sources as well as compression, encryption, and de-duplication, among others. Every backup scheme should include dry runs that validate the reliability of the data being backed up. It is important to recognize the limitations and human factors involved in any backup scheme.

What is Backup and Recovery?

In general, backup and recovery refers to the various strategies and procedures involved in protecting your database against data loss and reconstructing the database after any kind of data loss.

A backup is a copy of data from your database that can be used to reconstruct that data. Backups can be divided into physical backups and logical backups.

Physical backups are backups of the physical files used in storing and recovering your database, such as data files, control files, and archived redo logs. Ultimately, every physical backup is a copy of files storing database information to some other location, whether on disk or some offline storage such as tape.

Logical backups contain logical data (for example, tables or stored procedures) exported from a database with an export utility and stored in a binary file, for later re-importing into a database using the corresponding import utility.

Physical backups are the foundation of any sound backup and recovery strategy. Logical backups are a useful supplement to physical backups in many circumstances but are not sufficient protection against data loss without physical backups.

Unless otherwise specified, the term “backup” as used in the backup and recovery documentation refers to physical backups, and to back up part or all of your database is to take some kind of physical backup. The focus in the backup and recovery documentation set will be almost exclusively on physical backups.